• April 21, 2021

  • By: qiforlifeacupuncture

  • Comments (0)



Acupuncture and Dry Needling – What is the Difference?

Over the years I have had many of my clients ask what the difference is between acupuncture and dry needling so I have decided to address this in my blog.

Firstly, what do acupuncture and dry needling have in common?

The things that acupuncture and dry needling have in common are by far outweighed by their differences. One thing, though, acupuncture and dry needling have in common is that they both involve using fine needles to puncture the skin in order to provide relief from both acute and chronic  pain.  Another similarity is that acupuncture and dry needling sometimes use similar point locations and they also use the same tool – that being an acupuncture needle.

So, where do acupuncture and dry needling differ?

The differences between acupuncture and dry needling outnumber the similarities. Acupuncture is based on the Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) theory of the meridian system. Each meridian is related to an organ for example the liver, stomach or kidney.  During an acupuncture treatment, the practitioner aims to redirect energy or qi in the meridians from areas of excess to areas of deficiency helping the organs to function better and be more balanced, hence improving the health of the individual. The selection of points is based on removing obstructions to the flow or energy or qi in the meridians so that it can flow more freely. The acupuncture practitioner will look at the tongue and feel both pulses to determine the state of the organs, the yin and the yang, and the qi and blood. Acupuncture also stimulates the production of endorphins and balances the autonomic nervous system and correcting the imbalance of energy flow in the body. During an acupuncture treatment the needles are left in for 20 -40 minutes for optimal effect. Acupuncture treats insomnia, digestive issues urinary bladder issues, stress anxiety and chronic pain to name a few. Dry needling, on the other hand,  is focused in needling muscles and trigger points to disperse knots in the muscles, release myofascial tension, tightness and pain and improve flexibility and function of the muscle groups. Another difference between acupuncture and dry needling is that acupuncture has been practiced over centuries and it is now a well regulated industry with acupuncturists now doing a 4 year Bachelor Degree to become registered under the title of “Acupuncturist” with the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (Ahpra).   Ahpra works with the Chinese Medicine Board of Australia (CMBA), and has the role of ensuring that a set of standards and policies are met by practitioners of acupuncture. Dry needling is based on Western Medicine and was developed only recently and is not a regulated industry in Australia. For example physiotherapists, natural therapists and remedial massage therapists commonly do a 3 day dry needling course so they can then perform dry needling on their clients. As long as practitioners of dry needling do not advertise under the title of acupuncturist or say that they practise acupuncture they can perform the act of inserting needles in their patients, however they are not operating under Ahpra’s standards and regulations.

Labels:
  • December 22, 2019

  • By: qiforlifeacupuncture

  • Comments (0)

Many of my patients do not understand the significance of mid cycle cervical mucus which is the reason I am posting this blog in order to shed some light on the matter Fertile mucus starts getting produced about 6 days before ovulation as a result of a rise in the hormone estrogen. There are different types of mucus that are produced by the glands in the cervix. Many women are confused by which mucus is fertile and which isn't so I will try and make this easy to understand.. There is a type of discharge called G-Type mucus which is pasty and thick. This type is unable to be penetrated by sperm so it is not a fertile type of mucus. This is produced early in the cycle soon after the period. Then there is another type of mucus produced as estrogen levels rise more called L- Type mucus.It is a more liquid in texture. When ovulation is getting close the S-Type mucus is produced which has a more slippery and stretchy consistency and is also called egg-white mucus. The next type of mucus called P-Type mucus is the most fertile and is called P Type as it is rich in potassium. This mucus is not as stretchy but it gives a very slippery sensation to the vulva. The most fertile day in your cycle is the last day of this mucus being produced. This is the day before or the day of the egg being released out of the ovary or ovulation. If this is still daunting do not worry - my recommendation is to have sex every second day as soon as you feel the slipperiness on wiping. I have personally found that women who have followed this rule have had the most success in falling pregnant. Labels: • egg white cervical mucas • EWCM • fertile mucua • fertility acupuncture • IVF support

  • December 18, 2019

  • By: qiforlifeacupuncture

  • Comments (0)



If you have problems with regularity of your menstrual cycle, acne, excessive hair growth, excess weight and infertility, you could possibly have something known as Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome. Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome or PCOS is where the ovaries have many cysts or follicles that often don’t grow to produce viable eggs. It is due to this that ovulation does not always occur once a month like it should, resulting in irregular menstrual cycles where menstruation occurs less frequently of longer than 28 days. Some women have amenorrhoea or no periods for months or even years! Anxiety and depression are other possible symptoms of PCOS as well as obesity. PCOS is one of the most common causes of infertility. The cause of PCOS is high levels of insulin and/or high levels of male hormones called androgens. PCOS can be easily diagnosed by ultrasound and blood tests for hormonal levels. Doctors will often prescribe the Oral Contraceptive Pill to women with PCOS but all this does is mask the problem and when these women come off the pill to have a baby they find that they are still exhibiting the symptoms of PCOS and their cycle doesn’t come back regularly. It is imperative that women with PCOS manage their lifestyle by exercising regularly and having a low GI diet which is effective for weight loss and hence increasing rate of ovulation. Another reason being that PCOS sufferers are at increased risk of developing heart disease and type 2 diabetes later in life. Although treatment can include a healthy lifestyle, hormone therapy and other medications such as Chlomid, acupuncture and Chinese Herbs give very high rate of success in bringing the menstrual cycle back to 28 -30days hence increasing chances of ovulation, conception and pregnancy. Acupuncture focuses on re –establishing the function of the ovaries so that the eggs can ripen and be released from the ovary to be fertilized. In order to induce ovulation a selection of specific acupuncture points are used and been proven in studies to be effective in increasing ovulation rates. Acupuncture is also known to stimulate the secretion of Endorphins or feel good hormones as well as Melatonin and Serotonin making you feel more relaxed in general. I have had many patients come to my clinic with PCOS and I have had good results getting cycle back to a more regular 28 -30 day cycle by using a combination of acupuncture and Chinese Herbs. It is definitely worth a try! To view a recent research paper on the effectiveness of acupuncture on Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome go to https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4116535/